How to Lower Your Fare

Tips and links on tax-free transit benefits

Metro Card

Step One: Get With the TransitChek Program

You can lower your transit costs a lot. And you'll never have to wait on line in the subways again.

How? By getting your employer to join any one of several tax-free transit fare programs. Here's how tax-free transit fare benefits work:

You can have up to $255 a month of your salary exempt from all income taxes - as long as the money is used to pay for the cost of getting to work by transit. You don't need to do anything fancy, like itemize your taxes. The money will be automatically set aside and not reported as taxable income on your W-2 form.

The bottom line: You pay less in taxes. This can cut hundreds of dollars a year on your subway, bus or commuter rail costs. Your boss saves as well, because the company gets a similar break on employer taxes.

It’s really convenient. Many employees get their TransitChek MetroCards with their regular paychecks - some even get their MetroCards mailed to them to them.

Step Two: Get More Info

Several companies offer tax-free transit fare benefits. The MTA has compiled a list of providers. You can also learn more about NYC's new commuter benefits law.

Step Three: Talk to Your Employer

There are lots of good reasons your employer or company would want to provide tax-free transit benefits.

For another way to save time and money, find out how to buy MetroCards online and find out which merchants sell them.

In the News
In wheelchairs, unable to get around: Let's finally fix Access-A-Ride  (New York Daily News, July 15, 2018)
Transit groups turn up heat in Albany  (Queens Chronicle, July 12, 2018)
Transit groups demand pols support congestion pricing  (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, July 11, 2018)
Transit advocates release policy wish list for 2018 candidates vying for state office  (New York Daily News, July 10, 2018)
The state of the NYC subway, one year after Cuomo’s state of emergency  (Curbed, July 9, 2018)
MTA funds should be spent on transit only, Golden says  (Brooklyn Reporter, July 3, 2018)
Poor New Yorkers suffer more when the subway is delayed  (MarketWatch, July 2, 2018)
As questions over subway fixes loom, lawmakers demand funding  (Curbed, June 29, 2018)
Lawmakers, Activists Want Albany To Fast-Track Funding For Transit Repairs  (CBS 2, June 28, 2018)
Ceiling at Borough Hall Subway Platform Collapses, Injuring One  (Wall Street Journal, June 20, 2018)
New Yorkers are spurning public transport for ride sharing  (New York Post, June 17, 2018)
City budget includes $106 million for Fair Fares  (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 12, 2018)
Straphangers, Advocates Take Fight for ‘Fair Fares’ to City Hall Steps  (The Forum, June 7, 2018)
Pols decry ‘L’-ack of handicap access in subway shutdown  (The Villager, May 24, 2018)
The plan to fix NYC subways already faces an uncertain future because of a political feud  (NY1, May 23, 2018)
E train seat removal pilot’s success tough for MTA to call  (amNY, May 16, 2018)
How Riders Won the Fight for Better Buses in New York City  (City Limits, May 9, 2018)
Community groups want chat with de Blasio over funding discounted MetroCards for the poor  (New York Daily News, May 8, 2018)
The path of the first woman to lead NYC subways  (NY1, May 3, 2018)
This New York City Subway Station Gets Rave Reviews  (Wall Street Journal, May 1, 2018)